0 comments on “Podcast – Ash Young talks Everything in your PC is IoT”

Podcast – Ash Young talks Everything in your PC is IoT

Joining us this week is Ash Young, Chief Evangelist of Cachengo and OPNFV Ambassador. Cachengo builds smart, predictive storage for machine learning.

NOTE – We had a microphone problem that is solved at the 9 minute 19 second mark of the podcast. Start there if you find the clicking noise an issue

Highlights

  • 1 min 34 sec: Time to Change Basic Storage Architecture
    • Converged Protocol Appliances & Nothing has changed form early 90s
  • 7 min 8 sec: Sounds like Hadoop?
    • Underlying hardware still used proprietary protocols
  • 9 min 19 sec: Single Drive Cluster – it’s built?
    • 24 Servers and 24 Drives in a 1U ; has done 48 drives
    • Working on a new design for 96 drives in a 1U
  • 11 min 52 sec: Truly a Distributed Storage Array
    • Storage focused microservers
  • 13 min 24 sec: Limitations in Operations with Hardware
    • Hinders Innovation
  • 15 min 40 sec: Lessons Learned on Managing Devices
    • Over-dependence on tunneling protocols requiring full networking (e.g. VPN)
    • Move to peer-to-peer network slicing
  • 17 min 28 sec: Software Defined Networking Topology
    • Introduce devices to each other and get out of the way
  • 18 min 33sec: Every Storage Node is Part of the Network
    • Moves into a world of networking challenges
    • Ipv4 cannot support this model
  • 21 min 06 sec: Networking Magic in the Model
    • Peer to Peer w/ Broker Introduction and then Removal from Traffic
    • Scale out for Edge Computing Requires this New Model
    • 5G Energy Cost Savings are a Must
  • 27 min 28 sec: Issues of Powering On/Off Machines to Save Money
    • Creating a massive array of smaller GPUs for Machine Learning
    • Build a fast, cheap, lower power storage system to get started in the model
  • 34 min 09 sec: Doesn’t fit the model that Edge infrastructure will be Cloud patterned
    • Rob makes a point to listeners to consider various ideas in future Edge infrastructure
  • 36 min 48 sec: State of Open Source?
    • Consortium’s and open source standards
    • Creating the lowest common denominator free thing so competitors can build differentiation on top of it for revenue
    • Not a fan of open core models
  • 41 min 44 sec: Does Open Source include Supporting Implementation?
    • Look at the old WINE project financing
    • You can’t just deploy people onsite for free<
  • 48 min 24 sec: Wrap-Up

Podcast Guest: Ash Young,Chief Evangelist of Cachengo

Technology leader with over 20 years experience, primarily in storage. Created the first open source NAS (network attached storage) stack, the first unified block/file storage stack for Linux, the first storage management software, and the list goes on.

Since 2012, I have been heavily involved in NFV (Network Functions Virtualization). I wrote a bunch of the standards and was editor for the Compute/Storage Domain in the Infrastructure Working Group for NFV. And then I started up the open source effort to close the gaps for achieving our vision of the NFVI. This was the precursor to OPNFV.

The best way to understand what I do is to imagine being a high-level marketing exec who comes up with a whiz bang product and business idea, including business plan, competitive analysis, MRD, everything, but now comes the hand-off with your engineering organization, only to hear a litany of nos. Well, I got tired of being told “No, it can’t be done” or “No, we don’t know how to do it”, so I started doing it myself. I call this skill “Rapid Prototyping”, and over the years I have found it to be a very missing gap in the product development process. When Marketing comes up with ideas, we need a way to very efficiently validate the technology and business concepts before we commit to a lengthy engineering cycle.

I’m just one person, working in a company of over 180,000 people and in a very dynamic industry. My ability to get creative and to influence businesses is never a dull moment; and I will probably be 100 years old and still writing open source software.

0 comments on “Podcast – Ian Rae talks Cloud, Innovation, and Updates from Google Next 2018”

Podcast – Ian Rae talks Cloud, Innovation, and Updates from Google Next 2018

Joining us this week is Ian Rae, CEO and Founder CloudOps who recorded the podcast during the Google Next conference in 2018.

Highlights

  • 1 min 55 sec: Define Cloud from a CloudOps perspective
    • Business Model and an Operations Model
  • 3 min 59 sec: Update from Google Next 2018 event
    • Google is the “Engineer’s Cloud”
    • Google’s approach vs Amazon approach in feature design/release
  • 9 min 55 sec: Early Amazon ~ no easy button
    • Amazon educated the market as industry leader
  • 12 min04 sec: What is the state of Hybrid? Do we need it?
    • Complexity of systems leads to private, public as well as multiple cloud providers
    • Open source enabled workloads to run on various clouds even if the cloud was not designed to support a type of workload
    • Google’s strategy is around open source in the cloud
  • 14 min 12 sec: IBM visibility in open source and cloud market
    • Didn’t build cloud services (e.g. open a ticket to remap a VLAN)
  • 16 min 40 sec: OpenStack tied to compete on service components
    • Couldn’t compete without Product Managers to guide developers
    • Missed last mile between technology and customer
    • Didn’t want to take on the operational aspects of the customer
  • 19 min 31 sec: Is innovation driven from listening to customers vs developers doing what they think is best?
    • OpenStack is seen as legacy as customers look for Cloud Native Infrastructure
    • OpenStack vs Kubernetes install time significance
  • 22 min 44 sec: Google announcement of GKE for on-premises infrastructure
    • Not really On-premise; more like Platform9 for OpenStack
    • GKE solve end user experience and operational challenges to deliver it
  • 26 min 07 sec: Edge IT replaces what is On-Premises IT
    • Bullish on the future with Edge computing
    • 27 min 27 sec: Who delivers control plane for edge?
      • Recommends Open Source in control plan
  • 28 min 29 sec: Current tech hides the infrastructure problems
    • Someone still has to deal with the physical hardware
  • 30 min 53 sec: Commercial driver for rapid Edge adoption
  • 32 min 20 sec: CloudOps building software / next generation of BSS or OSS for telco
    • Meet the needs of the cloud provider for flexibility in generating services with the ability to change the service backend provider
    • Amazon is the new Win32
  • 38 min 07 sec: Can customers install their own software? Will people buy software anymore?
    • Compare payment models from Salesforce and Slack
    • Google allowing customers to run their technology themselves of allow Google to manage it for you
  • 40 min 43 sec: Wrap-Up

Podcast Guest: Ian Rae, CEO and Founder CloudOps

Ian Rae is the founder and CEO of CloudOps, a cloud computing consulting firm that provides multi-cloud solutions for software companies, enterprises and telecommunications providers. Ian is also the founder of cloud.ca, a Canadian cloud infrastructure as a service (IaaS) focused on data residency, privacy and security requirements. He is a partner at Year One Labs, a lean startup incubator, and is the founder of the Centre cloud.ca in Montreal. Prior to clouds, Ian was responsible for engineering at Coradiant, a leader in application performance management.

0 comments on “Week in Review: OpenStack Summit Highlights on Edge and Immutability”

Week in Review: OpenStack Summit Highlights on Edge and Immutability

Welcome to the RackN and Digital Rebar Weekly Review. You will find the latest news related to Edge, DevOps, SRE and other relevant topics.

Getting Edge-Y at OpenStack Summit – 5 Ways it’s an Easy Concept with Hard Delivery

The 2018 Vancouver OpenStack Summit is very focused on IT infrastructure at the Edge. It’s a fitting topic considering the telcos’ embrace for the project; however, building the highly distributed, small footprint management needed for these environments is very different than OpenStack’s architectural priorities. There is a significant risk that the community’s bias towards it’s current code base (which still has work needed to service hyper-scale and enterprise data centers) will undermine progress in building suitable Edge IT solutions.

There are five significant ways that Edge is different than “traditional” datacenter.  We often discuss this on our L8istSh9y podcast and it’s time to summarize them in a blog post.

Full Post

Avoiding Infrastructure at Rest -The Power of Immutable Infrastructure Talk 

Rob Hirschfeld’s talk at OpenStack Summit on Image-Based Deployment


News

RackN

Digital Rebar Community

L8ist Sh9y Podcast

Social Media

0 comments on “Getting Edge-y at OpenStack Summit – 5 ways it’s an easy concept with hard delivery”

Getting Edge-y at OpenStack Summit – 5 ways it’s an easy concept with hard delivery

The 2018 Vancouver OpenStack Summit is very focused on IT infrastructure at the Edge. It’s a fitting topic considering the telcos’ embrace for the project; however, building the highly distributed, small footprint management needed for these environments is very different than OpenStack’s architectural priorities. There is a significant risk that the community’s bias towards it’s current code base (which still has work needed to service hyper-scale and enterprise data centers) will undermine progress in building suitable Edge IT solutions.

There are five significant ways that Edge is different than “traditional” datacenter.  We often discuss this on our L8istSh9y podcast and it’s time to summarize them in a blog post.

IT infrastructure at the Edge is different than “edge” in general. Edge is often used as a superset of Internet of Things (IoT), personal devices (phones) and other emerging smart devices. Our interest here is not the devices but the services that are the next hop back supporting data storage, processing, aggregation and sharing. To scale, these services need to move from homes to controlled environments in shared locations like 5G towers, POP and regional data centers.

Unlike built-to-purpose edge devices, the edge infrastructure will be built on generic commodity hardware.

Here are five key ways that managing IT infrastructure at the edge is distinct from anything we’ve built so far:

  • Highly Distributed – Even at hyper-scale, we’re used to building cloud platforms in terms of tens of data centers; however, edge infrastructure sites will number in the thousands and millions!  That’s distinct management sites, not servers or cores. Since the sites will not have homogeneous hardware specifications, the management of these sites requires zero-touch management that is vendor neutral, resilient and secure.  
  • Low Latency Applications – Latency is the reason why Edge needs to be highly distributed.  Edge applications like A/R, V/R, autonomous robotics and even voice controls interact with humans (and other apps) in ways that require microsecond response times.  This speed of light limitation means that we cannot rely on hyper-scale data centers to consolidate infrastructure; instead, we have to push that infrastructure into the latency range of the users and devices.
  • Decentralized Data – A lot of data comes from all of these interactive edge devices.  In our multi-vendor innovative market, data from each location could end up being sprayed all over the planet.  Shared edge infrastructure provides an opportunity to aggregate this data locally where it can be shared and (maybe?) controlled. This is a very hard technical and business problem to solve.  While it’s easy to inject blockchain as a possible solution, the actual requirements are still evolving.
  • Remote, In-Environment Infrastructure – To make matters even harder, the sites are not traditional raised floor data centers with 24×7 attendants: most will be small, remote and unstaffed sites that require a truck roll for services.  Imagine an IT shed at the base of a vacant lot cell tower behind rusted chain link fences guarded by angry squirrels and monitored by underfunded FCC regulators.
  • Multi-Tenant and Trusted – Edge infrastructure will be a multi-tenant environment because it’s simple economics driving as-a-Service style resource sharing. Unlike buy-on-credit-card public clouds, the participants in the edge will have deeper, trusted relationships with the service providers.  A high degree of trust is required because distributed application and data management must be coordinated between the Edge infrastructure manager and the application authors.  This level of integration requires a deeper trust and inspect than current public clouds require.

These are hard problems!  Solving them requires new thinking and tools that while cloud native in design, are not cloud tools.  We should not expect to lift-and-shift cloud patterns directly into edge because the requirements are fundamentally different.  This next wave of innovation requires building for an even more distributed and automated architecture.

I hope you’re as excited as we are about helping build infrastructure at the edge.  What do you think the challenges are? We’d like to hear from you!

0 comments on “Catch up with the RackN and Digital Rebar Team at OpenStack Summit”

Catch up with the RackN and Digital Rebar Team at OpenStack Summit

We are heading out to Vancouver next week for the OpenStack Summit from May 21 – 24. Rob Hirschfeld, our Co-Founder/CEO will be available to meet onsite as well as help drive the OpenStack community forward. If you are interested in meeting, please contact me.

Rob has 2 sessions scheduled and we encourage you to attend.

Sessions

Security Considerations for Cloud Edge Computing
Date & Time: May 23 from 11:50 – 12:30pm

Location: Vancouver Convention Centre West – Level 2 – Room 205-207

Panel: (Moderator) Beth Cohen, Verizon : Rob Hirschfeld, RackN : Glen McGowan, Dell EMC : Shuquan Huang, 99cloud

Cloud Edge computing use cases range from IoT to VR/AR and any widely distributed application in between.  However, taking OpenStack out of the data center requires an entirely new approach to security when there is far less ability to restrict access and often the applications require a shared tenant model.

Avoiding Infrastructure at Rest – The Power of Immutable Infrastructure

Date & Time: May 23 from 3:30 – 4:10pm
Location: Vancouver Convention Center West – Level Three – Room 301

Keeping up with patches has never been more critical.  For hardware, that’s… hard.  What if servers were deployed 100% ready to run without any need for remote configuration or access?  What if we were able to roll a complete rebuild of an entire application stack from the BIOS up in minutes.  Those are key concepts behind a cloud deployment pattern called “immutable infrastructure”  because the servers are deployed from images produced by CI/CD process and destroyed after use instead of being reconfigured.

We’ll cover the specific process and it’s advantages.  Then we’ll dive deeply into open tools and processes that make it possible to drive immutable images into your own infrastructure.  The talk will include live demos and go discuss process and field challenges that attendees will likely face when they start implementation at home.  We’ll also cover the significant security, time and cost benefits of this approach to make pitching the idea effective.

0 comments on “Podcast: Gina Rosenthal (Minks) on Ops Challenges, Day 2 Ops Support, and Dev Ops Communication”

Podcast: Gina Rosenthal (Minks) on Ops Challenges, Day 2 Ops Support, and Dev Ops Communication

In this week’s podcast, we speak with Gina Rosenthal (Minks), Product Marketing Manager, VMware and experienced sys-admin/operator. She also hosts the Wide World of Tech podcast.

  • Cloud debate on virtualization and hypervisors as requirement
  • What makes Ops so hard?
  • Technical Communities for Day 2 Ops
  • Community Support for Vendors and Open Source
  • Is DevOps different than 5 years ago?
  • Devs and Operators Communication and Working Together

Topic                                                   Time (Minutes.Seconds)

Introduction                                             0.0 – 0.55
Background and Current Work            0.55 – 2.05
Wide World of Tech Podcast                2.05 – 4.00
Sys-Admin and Operators                     4.00 – 4.50
vSphere & Hypervisors for Cloud         4.50 – 5.28 (Hypervisors are a MUST for Cloud?)
What is a Cloud? Virtualization              5.28 – 7.33 (Building Blocks are Virtual?)
OpenStack Experience                           7.33 – 8.16 (Didn’t Fix Metal Part)
What makes Ops so hard?                     8.16 – 12.25
Devs want latest and Ops has old        12.25 – 16.03 (Demos and Stories)
Demo Day 2 for Ops                                16.03 – 19.10 (Maintaining product post install issues)
Community Vendor vs Open Source    19.10 – 25.03 (Vendors not accepted in open source)
Choosing Multiple Vendors/Tech         25.03 – 27.18 (Innovations and Stability)
2 Classes of Operators                            27.18 – 30.00 (Tension b/w new and stable is good)
DevOps is Dead                                        30.00 – 37.44 (VMware covered over Ops issues)
Too Much Abstraction for Devs?            37.44 – 49.55 (Key to Ops and Devs Communication)
Wrap Up                                                     49.55 – END

Podcast Guest
Gina Rosenthal (Minks), Product Marketing Manager, VMware

I have a varied background: technical trainer, *nix sysadmin, technical training developer, community manager, social media marketing manager, and now product marketing manager.

Those are just my paid gigs, I also have a social justice background, and have been blogging for 12 years. All these threads weave together in interesting and powerful ways.

At my core, I’m a storyteller and educator. I’m interested in telling the story of technology in simple, clear terms.

0 comments on “Sirens of Open Infrastructure beacons to OpenStack Community”

Sirens of Open Infrastructure beacons to OpenStack Community

OpenStack is a real platform doing real work for real users.  So why does OpenStack have a reputation for not working?  It falls into the lack of core-focus paradox: being too much to too many undermines your ability to do something well.  In this case, we keep conflating the community and the code.

I have a long history with the project but have been pretty much outside of it (yay, Kubernetes!) for the last 18 months.  That perspective helps me feel like I’m getting closer to the answer after spending a few days with the community at the latest OpenStack Summit in Sydney Australia.  While I love to think about the why, the what the leaders are doing about it is very interesting too.

Fundamentally, OpenStack’s problem is that infrastructure automation is too hard and big to be solved within a single effort.  

It’s so big that any workable solution will fail for a sizable number of hopeful operators.  That does not keep people from the false aspiration that OpenStack code will perfectly fit their needs (especially if they are unwilling to trim their requirements).

But the problem is not inflated expectations for OpenStack VM IaaS code, it’s that we keep feeding them.  I have been a long time champion for a small core with a clear ecosystem boundary.  When OpenStack code claims support for other use cases, it invites disappointment and frustration.

So why is OpenStack foundation moving to expand its scope as an Open Infrastructure community with additional focus areas?  It’s simple: the community is asking them to do it.

Within the vast space of infrastructure automation, there are clusters of aligned interest.  These clusters are sufficiently narrow that they can collaborate on shared technologies and practices.  They also have an partial overlap (Venn) with adjacencies where OpenStack is already present.  There is a strong economic and social drive for members in these overlapped communities to bridge together instead of creating new disparate groups.  Having the OpenStack foundation organize these efforts is a natural and expected function.

The danger of this expansion comes from also carrying the expectation that the technology (code) will also be carried into the adjacencies.  That’s my my exact rationale the original VM IaaS needs to be smaller.  The wealth of non-core projects crosses clusters of interests.  Instead of allowing these clusters to optimize their needs around shared interests, the users get the impression that they must broadly adopt unneeded or poorly fit components.  The idea of “competitive” projects should be reframed because they may overlap in function but not ui use-case fit.

It’s long past time to give up expectations that OpenStack is a “one-stop-shop” of infrastructure automation.  In my opinion, it undermines the community mission by excluding adjacencies.

I believe that OpenStack must work to embrace its role as an open infrastructure community; however, it must also do the hard work to create welcoming space for adjacencies.  These adjacencies will compete with existing projects currently under the OpenStack code tent.  The community needs to embrace that the hard work done so far may simply be sunk cost for new use cases. 

It’s the OpenStack community and the experience, not the code, that creates long term value.

0 comments on “November 10 – Weekly Recap of all things Digital Rebar and RackN”

November 10 – Weekly Recap of all things Digital Rebar and RackN

Welcome to the weekly post of the RackN blog recap of all things Digital Rebar, RackN, SRE, and DevOps. If you have any ideas for this recap or would like to include content please contact us at info@rackn.com or tweet Rob (@zehicle) or RackN (@rackngo)

Items of the Week

Digital Rebar

Digital Rebar Releases V3.2 – Stage Workflow

In v3.2, Digital Rebar continues to refine the groundbreaking provisioning workflow introduced in v3.1. Updates to the workflow make it easier to consume by external systems like Terraform. We’ve also improved the consistency and performance of both the content and service.

The release of workflow and the addition of inventory means that Digital Rebar v3 effectively replaces all key functions of v2 with a significantly smaller footprint, minimal learning curve and improved performance. One v2 major feature, multi-node coordination, is not on any roadmap for v3 because we believe those use case are well serviced by upstack integrations like Terraform and Ansible. Full Post

RackN

 

 

 

 

Joining this week’s L8ist Sh9y Podcast is Zach Smith, CEO of Packet and long-time champion of bare metal hardware. Rob Hirschfeld and Zach discuss the trends in bare metal, the impact of AWS changing the way developers view infrastructure, and issues between networking and server groups in IT organizations. (Blog with Topics and Times)

OpenStack Summit Sydney

Rob Hirschfeld and Ihor Dvoretskyi presented “Building Kubernetes based highly Customizable Environments on OpenStack with Kubespray.” Full Post

https://www.slideshare.net/RackN/slideshelf

UPCOMING EVENTS

Rob Hirschfeld and Greg Althaus are preparing for a series of upcoming events where they are speaking or just attending. If you are interested in meeting with them at these events please email info@rackn.com

If you are attending any of these events please reach out to Rob Hirschfeld to setup time to learn more about our solutions or discuss the latest industry trends.

OTHER NEWSLETTERS

 

0 comments on “Building Kubernetes based highly customizable environments on OpenStack with Kubespray”

Building Kubernetes based highly customizable environments on OpenStack with Kubespray

This talk was given on November 8 at the OpenStack Summit Sydney event.

Abstract

Kubespray (formerly Kargo) – is a project under Kubernetes community umbrella. From the technical side, it is a set of tools, that bring the possibility to deploy production-ready Kubernetes cluster easily.

Kubespray supports multiple Linux distributions to host the Kubernetes clusters (including Ubuntu, Debian, CentOS/RHEL and Container Linux by CoreOS), multiple cloud providers to be used as an underlay for the cluster deployment (AWS, DigitalOcean, GCE, Azure and OpenStack), together with the ability to use Bare Metal installations. It may consume Docker and rkt as the container runtimes for the containerized workloads, as well as a wide variety of networking plugins (Flannel, Weave, Calico and Canal); or built-in cloud provider networking instead.

In this talk we will describe the options of using Kubespray for building Kubernetes environments on OpenStack and how can you benefit from it.

What can I expect to learn?

Active Kubernetes community members, Ihor Dvoretskyi and Rob Hirschfeld, will highlight the benefits of running Kubernetes on top of OpenStack, and will describe how Kubespray may simplify the cluster building and management options for these use-cases.

Complete presentation

Slides
https://www.slideshare.net/RackN/slideshelf

Speakers

Ihor Dvoretskyi

Ihor is a Developer Advocate at Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), focused on the upstream Kubernetes-related efforts. He acts as a Product Manager at Kubernetes community, leading Product Management Special Interest Group with the goals of growing Kubernetes as a #1 open source container orchestration platform.

Rob Hirschfeld

Rob Hirschfeld has been involved in OpenStack since the earliest days with a focus on ops and building the infrastructure that powers cloud and storage.  He’s also co-Chair of the Kubernetes Cluster Ops SIG and a four term OpenStack board member.

 

0 comments on “Go CI/CD and Immutable Infrastructure for Edge Computing Management”

Go CI/CD and Immutable Infrastructure for Edge Computing Management

In our last post, we pretty much tore apart the idea of running mini-clouds on the edge because they are not designed to be managed at scale in resource constrained environments without deep hardware automation.  While I’m a huge advocate of API-driven infrastructure, I don’t believe in a one-size-fits-all API because a good API provides purpose-driven abstractions.

The logical extension is that having deep hardware automation means there’s no need for cloud (aka virtual infrastructure) APIs.  This is exactly what container-focused customers have been telling us at RackN in regular data centers so we’d expect the same to apply for edge infrastructure.

If “cloudification” is not the solution then where should we look for management patterns?  

We believe that software development CI/CD and immutable infrastructure patterns are well suited to edge infrastructure use cases.  We discussed this at a session at the OpenStack OpenDev Edge summit.

Continuous Integration / Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) software pipelines help to manage environments where the risk of making changes is significant by breaking the changes into small, verifiable units.  This is essential for edge because lack of physical access makes it very hard to mitigate problems.  Using CI/CD, especially with A/B testing, allows for controlled rolling distribution of new software.  

For example, in a 10,000 site deployment, the CI/CD infrastructure would continuously roll out updates and patches over the entire system.  Small incremental changes reduce the risk of a major flaw being introduced.  The effect is enhanced when changes are rolled slowly over the entire fleet instead of simultaneously rolled out to all sites (known as A/B or blue/green testing).  In the rolling deployment scenario, breaking changes can be detected and stopped before they have significant impacts.

These processes and the support software systems are already in place for large scale cloud software deployments.  There are likely gaps around physical proximity and heterogeneity; however, the process is there and initial use-case fit seems to be very good.

Immutable Infrastructure is a catch-all term for deployments based on images instead of configuration.  This concept is popular in cloud deployments were teams produce “golden” VM or container images that contain the exact version of software needed and then are provisioned with minimal secondary configuration.  In most cases, the images only need a small file injected (known as a cloud init) to complete the process.

In this immutable pattern, images are never updated post deployment; instead, instances are destroyed and recreated.  It’s a deploy, destroy, repeat process.  At RackN, we’ve been able to adapt Digital Rebar Provisioning to support this even at the hardware layer where images are delivered directly to disk and re-provisioning happens on a constant basis just like a cloud managing VMs.

The advantage of the immutable pattern is that we create a very repeatable and controlled environment.  Instead of trying to maintain elaborate configurations and bi-directional systems of record, we can simply reset whole environments.  In a CI/CD system, we constantly generate fresh images that are incrementally distributed through the environment.

Immutable Edge Infrastructure would mean building and deploying complete system images for our distributed environment.  Clearly, this requires moving around larger images than just pushing patches; however, these uploads can easily be staged and they provide critical repeatability in management.  The alternative is trying to keep track of which patches have been applied successfully to distributed systems.  Based on personal experience, having an atomic deliverable sounds very attractive.

CI/CD and Immutable patterns are deep and complex subjects that go beyond the scope of a single post; however, they also offer a concrete basis for building manageable data centers.

The takeaway is that we need to be looking first to scale distributed software management patterns to help build robust edge infrastructure platforms. Picking a cloud platform before we’ve figured out these concerns is a waste of time.

Previous 2 Posts on OpenStack Conference:

Post 1 – OpenStack on Edge? 4 Ways Edge is Distinct from Cloud
Post 2 – Edge Infrastructure is Not Just Thousands of Mini Clouds