0 comments on “DRP v3.11 PROVISIONS WITHOUT REBOOTING”

DRP v3.11 PROVISIONS WITHOUT REBOOTING

Some features are worth SHOUTING about, so it’s with great pride that I get to announce DRP v3.11.

The latest Digital Rebar release (v3.11) does the impossible: PROVISION WITHOUT REBOOTING.  Combined with image-based deploy and our unique multi-boot workflows, this capability makes server operations 10x faster than traditional net install processes.

But it’s not enough to have a tiny golang utility that can drive any hardware and install any operating system (we added MacOS netboot to this release).   RackN has been adding enterprise integrations to core platforms like Ansible Tower, Terraform, Active Directory, Remedy, Run Book and Logstash.

Oh!  And checkout our open zero-touch, HA Kubernetes installer (KRIB) based on kubeadm.  We just added advanced Helm features for automatic Istio and Rook Ceph examples.

To see more: https://github.com/digitalrebar/provision/releases/tag/v3.11.0

0 comments on “May 12 – Weekly Recap of All Things Site Reliability Engineering (SRE)”

May 12 – Weekly Recap of All Things Site Reliability Engineering (SRE)

Welcome to the weekly post of the RackN blog recap of all things SRE. If you have any ideas for this recap or would like to include content please contact us at info@rackn.com or tweet Rob (@zehicle) or RackN (@rackngo)

SRE Items of the Week

RobatOpenStack

OpenStack on Kubernetes: Will it blend? (OpenStack Summit Session) w/ Rob Hirschfeld

OpenStack and Kubernetes: Combining the Best of Both Worlds (OpenStack Summit Session) w/ Rob Hirschfeld

OpenStack Summit Boston Day 1 Notes by Rob Hirschfeld
https://robhirschfeld.com/2017/05/09/openstack-boston-day-1-notes/

Contrary to pundit expectations, OpenStack did not roll over and die during the keynotes yesterday.

In fact, I saw the signs of a maturing project seeing real use and adoption. More critically, OpenStack leadership started the event with an acknowledgement of being part of, not owning, the vibrant open infrastructure community. READ MORE

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Immutable Infrastructure Webinar

Attendees:

  • Greg Althaus, Co-Founder and CTO, RackN
  • Erica Windisch, Founder and CEO, Piston 
  • Christopher MacGown, Advisor, IOpipe
  • Riyaz Faizullabhoy,  Security Engineer, Docker
  • Sheng Liang, Founder and CEO Rancher Labs
  • Moderated by Stephen Spector, HPE, Cloud Evangelist

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SREies Part1: Configuration Management by Krishelle Hardson-Hurley

SREies is a series on topics related to my job as a Site Reliability Engineer (SRE). About a month ago, I wrote an article about what it means to be an SRE which included a compatibility quiz and resource list to those who were intrigued by the role. If you are unfamiliar with SRE, I would suggest starting there before moving on.

In this series, I will extend my description to include more specific summaries of concepts that I have learned during my first six months at Dropbox. In this edition, I will be discussing Configuration Management. READ MORE

UPCOMING EVENTS

Rob Hirschfeld and Greg Althaus are preparing for a series of upcoming events where they are speaking or just attending. If you are interested in meeting with them at these events please email info@rackn.com.

Interop ITX : May 15 – 19, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV

Gluecon : May 24 – 25, 2017 in Denver, CO

  • Surviving Day 2 in Open Source Hybrid Automation – May 23, 2017 : Rob Hirschfeld and Greg Althaus

OTHER NEWSLETTERS

SRE Weekly (@SREWeekly)Issue #71

1 comment on “LinuxKit and Three Concerns with Physical Provisioning of Immutable Images”

LinuxKit and Three Concerns with Physical Provisioning of Immutable Images

DR ProvisionAt Dockercon this week, Docker announced an immutable operating system called LinuxKit which is powered by a Packer-like utility called Moby that RackN CTO, Greg Althaus, explains in the video below.

For additional conference notes, check out Rob Hirschfeld’s Dockercon retro blog post.

Three Concerns with Immutable O/S on Physical

With a mix of excitement and apprehension, the RackN team has been watching physical deployment of immutable operating systems like CoreOS Container Linux and RancherOS.  Overall, we like the idea of a small locked (aka immutable) in-memory image for servers; however, the concept does not map perfectly to hardware.

Note: if you want to provision these operating systems in a production way, we can help you!

These operating systems work on a “less is more” approach that strips everything out of the images to make them small and secure.  

This is great for cloud-first approaches where VM size has a material impact in cost.  It’s particularly matched for container platforms where VMs are constantly being created and destroyed.  In these cases, the immutable image is easy to update and saves money.

So, why does that not work as well on physical?

First:  HA DHCP?!  It’s not as great a map for physical systems where operating system overhead is pretty minimal.  The model requires orchestrated rebooting of your hardware.  It also means that you need a highly available (HA) PXE Provisioning infrastructure (like we’re building with Digital Rebar).

Second: Configuration. That means that they must rely on having cloud-init injected configuration.  In a physical environment, there is no way to create cloud-init like injections without integrating with the kickstart systems (a feature of Digital Rebar Provision).  Further, hardware has a lot more configuration options (like hard drives and network interfaces) than VMs.  That means that we need a robust and system-by-system way to manage these configurations.

Third:  No SSH.  Yes another problem with these minimal images is that they are supposed to eliminate SSH.   Ideally, their image and configuration provides everything required to run the image without additional administration.  Unfortunately, many applications assume post-boot configuration.  That means that people often re-enable SSH to use tools like Ansible.  If it did not conflict with the very nature of the “do-not configure-the-server” immutable model, I would suggest that SSH is a perfectly reasonable requirement for operators running physical infrastructure.

In Summary, even with those issues, we are excited about the positive impact this immutable approach can have on data center operations.

With tooling like Digital Rebar, it’s possible to manage the issues above.  If this appeals to you, let us know!

1 comment on “2015 Container Review”

2015 Container Review

It’s been a banner year for container awareness and adoption so we wanted to recap 2015.  For RackN, container acceleration is near to our heart because we both enable and use them in fundamental ways.   Look for Rob’s 2016 predictions on his blog.

The RackN team has truly deep and broad experience with containers in practical use.  In the summer, we delivered multiple container orchestration workloads including Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, Cloud Foundry, StackEngine and others.  In the fall, we refactored Digital Rebar to use Docker Compose with dramatic results.  And we’ve been using Docker since 2013 (yes, “way back”) for ops provisioning and development.

To make it easier to review that experience, we are consolidating a list of our container related posts for 2015.

General Container Commentary

RackN & Digital Rebar Related

4 comments on “Faster, Simpler AND Smaller – Immutable Provisioning with Docker Compose!”

Faster, Simpler AND Smaller – Immutable Provisioning with Docker Compose!

Nearly 10 TIMES faster system resets – that’s the result of fully enabling an multi-container immutable deployment on Digital Rebar.

Docker ComposeI’ve been having a “containers all the way down” month since we launched Digital Rebar deployment using Docker Compose. I don’t want to imply that we rubbed Docker on the platform and magic happened. The RackN team spent nearly a year building up the Consul integration and service wrappers for our platform before we were ready to fully migrate.

During the Digital Rebar migration, we took our already service-oriented code base and broke it into microservices. Specifically, the Digital Rebar parts (the API and engine) now run in their own container and each service (DNS, DHCP, Provisioning, Logging, NTP, etc) also has a dedicated container. Likewise, supporting items like Consul and PostgreSQL are, surprise, managed in dedicated containers too. All together, that’s over nine containers and we continue to partition out services.

We use Docker Compose to coordinate the start-up and Consul to wire everything together. Both play a role, but Consul is the critical glue that allows Digital Rebar components to find each other. These were not random choices. We’ve been using a Docker package for over two years and using Consul service registration as an architectural choice for over a year.

Service registration plays a major role in the functional ops design because we’ve been wrapping datacenter services like DNS with APIs. Consul is a separation between providing and consuming the service. Our previous design required us to track the running service. This worked until customers asked for pluggable services (and every customer needs pluggable services as they scale).

Besides being a faster to reset the environment, there are several additional wins:

  1. more transparent in how it operates – it’s obvious which containers provide each service and easy to monitor them as individuals.
  2. easier to distribute services in the environment – we can find where the service runs because of the Consul registration, so we don’t have to manage it.
  3. possible to have redundant services – it’s easy to spin up new services even on the same system
  4. make services pluggable – as long as the service registers and there’s an API, we can replace the implementation.
  5. no concern about which distribution is used – all our containers are Ubuntu user space but the host can be anything.
  6. changes to components are more isolated – changing one service does not require a lot of downloading.

Docker and microservices are not magic but the benefits are real. Be prepared to make architectural investments to realize the gains.

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